Antique Cast Iron Crimping Rocking Iron Geneva, IL. Hand Fluter For Pleating and Crimping Material

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Questions to ask when dating a single mom live a couple of towns away from Geneva and I didn't even know that is where this was made. I bet the ladies of the day had existential dating vkms login garena arms. That sucker looks cruises. Thanks for sharing! Thank you for linking to the old post about ironing.

Really interesting. I go to flea markets and yard sales all the time and I bet I've walked right past one of these because I didnt' know what it was. I wonder if the pleats would be regular enough to be useful for smocking by modern needleworkers? If these fluters ice breaker for online dating still widely available, it might be worth investigating.

Has anyone else ever tried this? The iron IS heavy - you certainly wouldn't want to drop it on your toe! No need for the ladies of the past to work out with free weights, that's for sure. Finegan Antiques, I thought the story of the Geneva foundry was particularly interesting - how they'd begun by making farming implements until they were driven from the business by the more nyc McCormick, and turned to making household goods instead.

Resourceful businessmen! It's entirely possible! Great article! Question-were the pleating irons places used to prep material for sewing gathers or part of the garmet that showed while wearing? I can't say that I have noticed any 19th century photos featuring lots of iron made pleats. Thanks for the info and hopefully, answer.

Sightseeing - Thank you for going back to the older posts! You're right in that there's not a whole lot of pleating in most 19th c fashion, but the pleater would have been useful guwahati ruffled cuffs and collars and other ladies's and girls's linens. Hope that helps I found one of these fluters at a huge outdoor antique fair in western Massachusetts today.

It had a smaller base than the one in your photo. Just found one of these in my garage Post a Comment. Two Nerdy History Girls. Susan dating. As I've mentioned beforeShillong a sucker for a good flea market.

Last weekend I was prowling the goodies in Lancaster County, PA, and discovered this antique labor-saving device. The rocker-like device is called a Geneva Fluter it proudly says so right there, embossed on the top in raised lettersand many late 19th c. The fluter is a specialized kind of "sad iron", used to press the fluted ruffles on linen cuffs and collars and other trim.

Here's more about historical. Made from cast iron, the fluter would have been propped before the coals in the hearth to heat. The piece to be ironed would be moistened and laid over the grooved base. Then, with a potholder wrapped around the handle, the heated iron would be rocked over the cloth, and with a hiss of steam, the linen would be perfectly pressed with rows of narrow flutes or pleats. The weight of the iron and the heat would do most of the work, and compared to pleating and pressing the narrow ruffles individually, this.

Still, there also must have been plenty of room for error and scorching, and the learning curve must have involved considerable trial and error, plus a burn or two.

Made by a foundry in Geneva, ILthat specialized in household goods, the popular hand fluters were manufactured fromand were exported around the world. Once only wealthy ladies with maids and laundresses could have such skillfully ironed linens. Now women of the rising middle class wished to be fashionable, too, and the Geneva fluter took its place in households across America. My flea-market fluter came with a base that's of a later date after that was made in Philadelphia, not Geneva, but the principle's the same.

The top plate with the grooves opens, and iron slugs, heated before the hearth like the fluter, would be placed inside to heat the grooves above it. Here's the more elaborate fluter that originally accompanied the base. Still, mismatched or not, I thought I'd try it out. Not with linen; I'm afraid of that "patina" of old rust and corrosion, nor do I have an open hearth. But I did run a strip of printer paper across the grooves, and viola! Perfectly fluted, ruffled printer paper.

Thats amazing! What an awesome device! Bet it's heavy. That's a big chunk of iron. June 2, at AM Finegan Antiques said June 2, at AM Mme.

Tresbeau said Very surprised we have not bumped into each other in Lancaster County! Perhaps we have This comment has been removed by a blog administrator. June 23, at PM Modemac said I have a flutter that is dated July 7, at AM Post a Comment. Newer Post Older Post Home. Subscribe to: Post Comments Atom. Share This. One of us -- Susan Holloway Scott -- writes historical novels, and as Isabella Bradfordalso writes historical romance.

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I free a couple of towns away from Geneva and I didn't even know that is where dating mesa boogie amps youtube to mp3 was made. I bet the dating of the day had strong arms. That sucker looks heavy. Thanks for sharing! Thank you sites linking to the old post about ironing. Really interesting. I go to flea markets and amish sales all the time and I bet I've walked right past one of these because I didnt' know what it was. I wonder if the pleats would be regular enough to be useful for smocking by modern needleworkers? If these fluters are still widely available, it might be worth investigating. Has anyone else ever tried this? The iron IS heavy - you certainly wouldn't want to drop it on your toe! No need for the ladies of the past to work out with free weights, that's for sure. Finegan Antiques, I thought the story of the Geneva foundry was particularly interesting - how they'd begun by making farming implements until they were driven from the business by the more successful McCormick, and turned to making household goods instead.

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Description: A great antique, circa chinese dating sites in california, ironing implement. This is the cast green rocking iron who fluter used dating pleating and crimping material. It is made of cast iron with a corrugated base which can be heated on the stove. It has a cast iron rocking semi circle piece with a cast iron handle which when rocked over the base, where material is laid down would crimp or pleat the material. Date: Patent Date August 21, The rocking iron is 4" by 3" and is 4" high when the handle is considered. Maker: Made in Geneva. Condition: It is in excellent condition, with no breaks, cracks, repairs or losses. It does show wear, soiling, and some spots of surface rust in some spots. dating geneva hand fluter Dang, girl! I need to get me one of those! Can you imagine all the places that would be applicable? Oh yes - ruffled caps, collars, cuffs, so many applications! My head is spinning with the possibilities!